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  • Our Cathedral Bells

    The seven bells of Holy Trinity Cathedral are one of our great civic and ecclesiastical treasures. Five of the seven were a gift from Tsar Alexander III of Russia in thanksgiving for the miraculous preservation of his life (and those of his family) from an assassination attempt. Two other bells were locally recast by Garrett and Co. from older bells that melted during one of several fires that seriously damaged the temple in the course of the years....  Read More

     

  • Forgiveness

    In an Orthodox parish there is really nothing to compare to the unique Vespers of Forgiveness served on the very eve of Great Lent. Much has already been written about this Service elsewhere, and lots already has been said. All that remains is for us to come and to participate in the Vespers, ask forgiveness of each other, giving forgiveness to all—whether they ask or not—and supporting one another during the Lenten ascetic effort. The forty days of Lent—a tithe of our year—begins on Sunday, February 26 at 6:00 PM. If for some reason it is impossible to attend the Vespers, and that would be unfortunate, then find the time to seek out those from whom you need to ask forgiveness before you leave the church that day.

  • This Sunday

    How shall it be in that hour and fearful day, when the Judge shall sit on his dread throne! The books shall be opened and men’s actions shall be examined, and the secrets of darkness shall be made public. Angels shall hasten to and fro, gathering all the nations. Come ye and hearken, kings and princes, slaves and free, sinners and righteous, rich and poor: for the Judge comes to pass sentence on the whole inhabited earth. And who shall bear to stand before his face in the presence of the angels, as they call us to account for our actions and our thoughts, whether by night or by day? How shall it be then in that hour! But before the end is here, make haste, my soul, and cry: O God who only art compassionate, turn me back and save me. —a hymn of the day

  • This Week

    Sun, Feb 12: 10:00 am Divine Liturgy, followed by fellowship meal

    Wed, Feb 15: 6:00 pm Vespers and Study Group with Adn. Kirill: "Liturgy & Life"

    Sat, Feb 18: 9:00 am Memorial Divine Liturgy; 10 am Pre-Lenten Retreat; 6:00 pm Vigil

    Sun, Feb 19: 10:00 am Divine Liturgy, followed by fellowship meal and Study Group with Prof. Antokhin: Life of St. Anthony

    Visit our full calendar of services

Welcome to Holy Trinity

We gather for worship on Saturday evening and on Sunday Morning. We are old. We are young. We are middle aged. Some are married, some are single. Many of us have come to the Orthodox Church after years of searching. The Orthodox Church is the historical Church, which was founded on the day of Pentecost in Jerusalem and spread throughout Judea and finally the world. In our services we celebrate the great truths of the Christian Faith.

Holy Trinity Cathedral is named after the Godhead; God the Father, God the Son and God the Holy Spirit. This is particularly significant in that the Trinitarian understanding of the Godhead based upon the revelation of God, is uniquely Christian. The Orthodox Church has often been referred to as "the Church of the Holy Trinity" because of her commitment to the critical necessity of maintaining the Trinitarian faith. If God is One yet Three Persons as He has revealed Himself to be, and if we are created in the image and likeness of God, then understanding and living out this Trinitarian nature is critical to our life and faith...

  • May 15 2012

Sunday of the Prodigal Son

Icon of the Prodigal Son

On this day we celebrate the Sunday of the Prodigal Son, dedicated as the second service of the Triodion by the divine Fathers for the following reason: There are some who recognize much in themselves that is unbecoming, who live a life of great dissipation from their youth, whose lives are full of drunkenness and immorality, who having fallen thus into the depths of evil, become despondent, giving birth to pride, from whence they have no desire to advance to any of the virtues, preferring their bondage to evil and falling ever deeper into evil. Having a fatherly love for even these individuals, and desiring to lead them out of their despair, the Holy Fathers prescribed this parable for the second preparatory Sunday in order to tear up the passion of despair by the roots, to lead them to acceptance of the virtues, and to demonstrate to sinners the abundance of God's compassion upon sinners and prodigals in His great goodness and love for mankind. For there is no sin which cannot be overcome by the knowledge of His love for mankind, and this is what is presented in this parable of Christ...

 

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