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  • The Bells of Holy Trinity

    The seven bells of Holy Trinity Cathedral are one of our great civic and ecclesiastical treasures. Five of the seven were a gift from Tsar Alexander III of Russia in thanksgiving for the miraculous preservation of his life (and those of his family) from an assassination attempt. Two other bells were locally recast by Garrett & Co. from older bells that melted during one of several fires that seriously damaged the temple in the course of the years...  Read more...

  • 40th Anniversary of Glorification of St. Innocent of Alaska

    Saint Innocent (Veniaminov), Metropolitan of Moscow and Kolomensk (August 26, 1797—March 31, 1879), was glorified by the Russian Orthodox Church on October 6, 1977. He was born in the village of Anginsk in the Irkutsk diocese. The Apostle of America and Siberia proclaimed the Gospel “even to the ends of the earth”...  More

     

  • Appeal for fire victims

    In response to the terrible fires in the Santa Rosa area and the losses parishioners and their neighbors have endured, St. Seraphim Cathedral in Santa Rosa has established a fund to provide immediate help and assistance. His Eminence, Archbishop Benjamin encourages us to contribute to this immediate need.  We will be collecting at the Sunday liturgy or you can give through this link.

     

  • Upcoming

    Wed, Oct 18: 5:30 pm Memorial service; 6:00 pm Vespers; followed by parish council meeting.

    Sat, Oct 21: 9:00 am Memorial Liturgy; 6:00 pm Vigil.

    Sun, Oct 22: 10:00 am Divine Liturgy, followed by fellowship meal.

    Wed, Oct 25: 6:00 pm Vespers.

    Visit our full calendar of services

Holy Week and Pascha

Taking Down from the CrossThe Eastern Orthodox calendar consists of a sequence of feasts and fasts commemorating the Incarnation and its fulfillment in the Church. Pre-eminent among all the festivals is Pascha, the Feast of Feasts, which determines all the movable feasts for the liturgical calendar.

The week before Pascha in the Orthodox Church, called Great and Holy Week, is set apart in the ecclesiastical year, so that we might stop and change our pace, meditate upon and relive the last week in our Lord's life which opened the doors of paradise. The events are presented as a drama bringing us to identify ourselves with them and elevate us in an all-embracing movement upward to God. As we relive the annual drama, we receive its benefits and allow the events to transform us into renewed Christians. We fully participate in the services as if actually entering God's Kingdom with hearts filled with faith, minds open to revelation, and a will of concern for spiritual ascent. The scenes take place in Jerusalem. The participants are real. The events, though historical, occur in the present. The laity responds to what it sees and hears... More

Forgiveness and the Gift of Lent

by Fr. Alexander Schmemann

A Homily delivered to the community at St. Vladimir's Orthodox Seminary

Forgiveness Sunday of 1983

As once more we are about to enter the Great Lent, I would like to remind us – myself first of all, and all of you my fathers, brothers, and sisters – of the verse that we just sang, one of the stichera, and that verse says:"Let us begin Lent, the Fast, with joy." 

Only yesterday we were commemorating Adam crying, lamenting at the gates of Paradise, and now every second line of the Triodion and the liturgical books of Great Lent will speak of repentance, acknowledging what dark and helpless lives we live, in which we sometimes are immersed. And yet, no one will prove to me that the general tonality of Great Lent is not that of a tremendous joy! Not what we call "joy" in this world – not just something entertaining, interesting, or amusing – but the deepest definition of joy, that joy of which Christ says: "no one will take away from you" (Jn. 16:22). Why joy? What is that joy?

So many people under various influences have come to think of Lent as a kind of self–inflicted inconvenience. Very often in Lent we hear these conversations: "What do you give up for Lent?" – it goes from candy to, I don’t know what. There is the idea that if we suffer enough, if we feel the hunger enough, if we try by all kinds of strong or light ascetical tools, mainly to "suffer" and be "tortured," so to speak, it would help us to "pay" for our absolution. But this is not our Orthodox faith. Lent is not a punishment. Lent is not a kind of painful medicine that helps only inasmuch as it is painful...

  • Feb 25 2017

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